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Spencer Stuart’s burns to keynote

February 27, 2018

Seasoned industry leader Suzanne Burns of Spencer Stuart, one of the world’s leading global executive search and leadership consulting firms, will outline how to build a new industrial culture that balances the need to deliver consistent, profitable growth against the ability to absorb and capitalize on disruptive digital innovations.

Click here to learn more about the 4th Annual Smart Industry conference.

AGCO’s Gulick to speak

February 27, 2018

Peggy Gulick is director of digital transformation, global manufacturing, for AGCO, the $7.4 billion world leader in the design, manufacturing and distribution of agricultural equipment. She’ll share how new digital tools ranging from wearables and exoskeletons to 3D printing and mobile are helping to energize the company’s ongoing lean and continuous-improvement initiatives.

Click here to learn more about the 4th Annual Smart Industry conference.

TRUMPF smart factory added to tour offerings

February 27, 2018

As an Industry 4.0 pioneer, metal-fabricating giant TRUMPF opened a smart factory in Chicago in September 2017 that ‘intelligently connects’ an entire sheet metal process chain – from the initial order, to its design, manufacture and delivery. Join us for a behind-the-scenes tour of this $30 million facility to see how a fully networked production system works in the real world.

Click here to learn more about the 4th Annual Smart Industry conference.

Intel’s McCreary & Petrick to Keynote

February 27, 2018

Faith McCreary, Principle Engineer at Intel, and Irene Petrick, Market Innovation Director – Internet of Things Group at Intel will discuss the pain points that motivate adoption of smart technologies, examine role-based differences that influence acceptance of IIoT technologies, and share leadership strategies for accelerating transition to the intelligent factory.

Click here to learn more about the 4th Annual Smart Industry conference.

U.S. Chemicals: The Luster Returns

January 8, 2015

Production should grow moderately in 2015 and for the next several years.

After a promising start, the global economy faltered in 2014 because of heightened geopolitical uncertainty, recessions in Brazil, Japan and many European nations, as well as slowdowns in China, some countries in the European Union and elsewhere. So, the manufacturing sector, which represents the primary customer base for chemicals, entered a soft period in 2014, with particular weakness in Europe and East Asia. However, the global industrial cycle is beginning to turn upwards, led by the United States, the United Kingdom and other nations. Moreover, both supportive monetary policy around the world and virtually non-existent inflationary pressures bolster the trend.

In the United States, the economy is growing but below its potential as high taxes, debt and regulatory burdens still take a toll on both business and consumer confidence. As a result, businesses have been cautious and will slow capital spending in 2015. Furthermore, overseas weakness and a higher dollar dampen U.S. exports. With household deleveraging over, further improvements in the employment situation, lower oil prices fostering discretionary income and asset prices moving higher are prompting consumers to start to spend again. To read more, visit Chemical Processing for more details.